Abuse in dating relationships statistics

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The Urban Institute’s Justice Policy Center released a 2013 study examining the role technology plays in teen dating abuse.According to the study, 26 percent of teens in a romantic relationship said their partners had digitally abused them during the previous year using social media, email, and text messages.(Liz Claiborne, Teen Research Unlimited Survey, released July 2008)A study of public high school students in New York City found females who recently experienced dating violence and males who experienced sexual assault some time in their lives are more likely to report suicide attempts than their counterparts without similar histories of violence.Dating Violence, Sexual Assault, and Suicide Attempts Among Urban Teenagers is published in the June 2007 edition of the Archives of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine.Among those that have engaged in a dating relationship, 55% had their first dating relationship by the age of 12.Although dating violence occurs at any stage of life, most of the Canadian research published to date has focused on high school, college or university students (Wekerle , 2009)(Straus, 2004)(De Keseredy & Kelly, 1993).“Abusers use technology to stalk their partners, send them degrading messages, embarrass them publicly, and pressure them for sex or sexually explicit photos,” Dank added.Among the study’s key findings: SAN FRANCISCO (April 27, 2016) – Futures Without Violence (FUTURES) announced today that it received its first Webby Award for That’s Not Cool, a website aimed at preventing teen dating violence and digital abuse.

“New technologies–social networking sites, texts, cell phones, and emails–have given abusers another way to control, degrade, and frighten their partners,” Zweig stated.

The prevalence of dating violence varies by study, depending on the definition of violence used and the age of respondents.

The 1993 Violence Against Women Survey (VAWS) found that 16% of women had experienced physical or sexual violence in a dating relationship since the age of 16.

Similar numbers of both sexes say they've been abusers.

Additional new research shows teens who abuse their girlfriends and boyfriends often share a past as middle-school bullies.

The findings, published in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence, are based on a survey of 5,647 dating middle-school and high-school students, making it the most comprehensive study of its kind to date.

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